Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Sourdough Rye with Walnuts

This is another bread to get excited about! The first time I made this loaf I gave it a 9.5/10 and I am not an easy grader. I nice crust, nice walnut flavor combined with a balanced amount of acidity. The crumb is not to open or to tight. A great bread, a perfect slice for some fresh goat cheese!


This bread has a noticable of Whole Rye Flour, I dont use medium or light rye flour, because I grind my own flour, and I just buy rye berreis, but this bread is 50% whole rye flour by weight and the remaining is bread flour, it does have a significant rye flavor, which I love! Of course I do make some breads that are lighter and have a good portion of bread flour, but most of the loaves that i love are whole grain loaves, and this one is a treasure.


Jeffrey Hamelman notes in his book that the amount of walnuts in this book can be substitutes with soaked raisins, or half of the weight of walnuts can be substituted with raisins. I take this a step further, I think dried cranberries and walnuts would be great in this loaf. Even some very dark chocolate chunks would be great in this bread, call me crazy, but I think it would be delicious.


This is another loaf that I am taking to Bloomington with me for the Holiday. Bread for me is a material question, but bread for my neighbor is a spiritual question. I really enjoy sharing bread, especially with people who will enjoy it, and I know these breads (Rye with Walnuts and Sunflower seed Rye) will go great with the typical Thanksgiving themes!


It is important that you do not mix this dough with the walnuts. First mix on first speed with a dough hook for three minutes, then on second speed for three minutes. There will be considerable gluten development and there will be considerable muscle present in the dough. Now pull the dough away from the dough hook and add 1/3 of the walnuts and mix for 30 seconds on first speed. Add the remaining walnuts and mix until the nuts are well incorporated throughout the dough. This process just helps to reduce the strain on the gluten provided by the nuts. If raisins are being used it is important to soak them in warm water for atleast 30 minutes, if this is skipped the raisins will achieve to much color during the bake.


 Like the Sunflower Seed Rye this bread does use a little bit of yeast, so the fermentation time is only two hours: one hour in bulk and one hour proofing after the dough has been shaped. It then bakes for about 40 minutes at 450 degrees on a well preheated baking stone. Steam the oven before the loading and right after the loading to help with rise and crust development.




Happy Thanksgiving
-DW

1 comment :

  1. Dude, I guess we're still psychically linked, because I've been on this rye-sourdough kick for the last few months as well. It started with a great sourdough rye I had at an Austrian bakery in Chicago. The first few I made used a starter and then some yeast, but finally I'm attempting one with just sourdough. The 100% rye was beautifully sour. And who can say no to a no-knead bread?

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